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This section contains descriptions of unexplained facts provided by eyewitnesses or published in the media, as well as the results of their analysis by the group.

Chronorally. United Kingdom

ID #1710434512
Added Thu, 14/03/2024
Author July N.
Sources
Phenomena
Status
Hypothesis

Initial data

Initial information from sources or from an eyewitness
Incident date: 
03.2020
Location: 
Чаринг-Кросс
Лондон
United Kingdom

Most of us live in a state of mindless acceptance. We walk through an area of this life that is little questioned, because in our youth we were taught many things, so we are programmed by the prejudices and belief systems of our parents and people before them, so we rarely see existence as it really is. But from time to time, something can open our minds and hint that what we think we know about the universe is nonsense.

One of the most unpleasant things that can shake a person and bring him out of a state of conditioning is the time shift, because it makes a mockery of everything that our elders taught us about time.

We believe that time has an arrow that moves from the past to the future, and it moves steadily, and nothing can accelerate or slow it down.

The great Isaac Newton succumbed to this belief, but Einstein and other scientists then proved, first mathematically and then experimentally, that time can be stretched like an elastic band through a process known as time dilation, and now even "time flow". This is viewed with suspicion by quantum physicists who deal with the symmetry of time reversal – because, it would seem, time can move forward and backward.

A time shift is a phenomenon by which a person can end up in the past or in the future; we all, of course, slide into the future at the rate of one second per second, but in the time shifts I'm talking about, people can end up from a few hours to centuries in the future — or in the past.

At the end of March 2020, when the country was blocked due to the Covid-19 pandemic, a homeless 45-year-old man named Gavin was looking for a place to spend the night.

He had been sleeping poorly for the past three years, starting with "couch surfing" at friends' houses until their patience ran out due to alcohol problems.

There was talk of plans to move homeless people off the streets to emergency housing, "safe for Covid," but no one has contacted Gavin yet.

He was walking along deserted Oxton Road, Wirral, UK, heading towards Grange Road, where his old school friend named George may have lived in an apartment above a shop.

If George was still there, surely he wouldn't have rejected him? Gavin bent his head into the icy wind, wrapped a scarf around his neck, buttoned an old tweed jacket and clenched the strap of a bag with a cold fist, which contained a five-pound note, a small radio with a dead battery, someone lost reading glasses, underwear, socks and a copy of the novel "Jonathan Livingston's Seagull".

Before Gavin got to Grange Road, something unusual happened.

There was an explosion of noise–the voices of people, the trampling of horses pulling carts, and now the sun was beating down.

Gavin felt like he had been transported to Spain, but the setting was vaguely familiar.

The McDonald's was gone, and in its place stood a huge tavern. He was still in the Charing Cross area, but that was clearly in the past, and it seemed like it was summer. Gavin thought he should go to the pub where McDonald's was less than a minute ago, but a policeman stood in his way and asked, "Where are you from?" and he looked Gavin up and down, and his steely pale blue eyes, which glowed fluorescent under the shadow of the pointed helmet, focused on Gavin's bag.

"Look, Officer, you won't believe this, but I'm from two thousand and twenty," Gavin said, and now he's gone from the optimism of feeling the summer heat on his face to the terrible realization that he was back in another era, perhaps the Victorian one.

The policeman narrowed his bulging blue eyes and said:

— You're composing something. I think you'd better start talking, otherwise you and I will go! Name and business, a little harsh.

"My name is Gavin [and he gave his last name and former address when he lived on Clermount Road, Wallasey, three years ago]. And now I don't have a business, I'm homeless. I used to be a programmer."

Gavin said the last sentence humbly, because he knew that this policeman had no idea what kind of profession it was. He just knew that he was about to be arrested and interrogated.

Copper pushed his helmet back slightly and scratched his forehead. 

— Well, I dare say, I have never seen such far-fetched nonsense in all my years! Are you out of your mind, sir, or are you crazy?

"I know it sounds crazy, but I'm telling the truth," Gavin said, his mouth dry. There was a scream from behind the policeman, and he turned to look at two men fighting outside the pub where Gavin was heading–the Grange Hotel.

The policeman turned to Gavin and said:

"You have to stay here while I go and deal with them! Do you understand?" and he pointed to a small island of safety, and then ran towards the fighting drunks.

Gavin froze in place for a moment, and then took a chance and ran down Grange Road. He almost collided with a bicycle and a trailer – a strange situation when a man in a straw boater pedaled a bicycle to which a two-wheeled rickshaw-type car was tied, on which sat a woman in a huge hat decorated with artificial flowers. .

Gavin continued to run, trying to stay as far away from the police as possible; The thought of being stuck in this bygone era in a gloomy police station cell scared him.

Gavin ended up on Conway Street, where a gruff young man and his colleague named Tommy approached him and asked what was in the bag. 

"Nothing of value, just clothes," Gavin said, knowing what would happen next.

—Come on,— Tommy said, took the bag from Gavin and said to his friend, "Can we get his coat, Johnny?"

A man came out of a nearby pawnbroker and told two hooligans, "Give it back to this man, or I'll inform that policeman!"

"Johnny" dropped the bag at Gavin's feet, and he and Tommy slipped into the alley.

"Are you all right, sir?"  The man asked and explained that he was one of the owners of the nearest pawnshop, and advised Gavin to go and talk to a policeman from a distance. "The big guy who needed your bag was John Rimmer. He is well known to the police.

"Thank you very much," said a grateful Gavin, who was not going to address the police because of the outlandish predicament. He asked a question that must have seemed very strange to the interest rate payer: "I know it may seem strange, but what year are we in now?"

—Eh?— asked the puzzled good Samaritan.

"I have a blow to the head and I can't remember what year it is," said the quick—witted Gavin.

"It's 1909," the man replied and advised Gavin to see a doctor.

The shock of learning that it was 1909 made Gavin dizzy, and in an instant he found himself back in 2020.

Shortly after that, he fell ill with Covid, and he had an alarming thought: could he have transmitted this damn virus to that policeman or those hooligans in 1909?

Original news

Most of us live in a state of unthinking acceptance. We stroll through the little-questioned area of this life, having been indoctrinated about many things in our youth so that we are programmed with the prejudices and belief systems of our parents and the people before them, so we rarely see existence as it really is, but now and then, something may open our minds and hint that what we think we know about the universe is claptrap.

One of the most jarring things that can shake a person awake and shock them out of their conditioning is the timeslip, because it makes a mockery about all of the things our elders taught us about time.

We believe time has an arrow that travels from the past to the future and it moves steadily and nothing can speed it up or slow it down.

The great Isaac Newton fell for that belief, but Einstein and other scientists then proved, mathematically at first and then through experiment, that time could be stretched like an elastic band through a process known as time dilation, and now even the ‘flow of time’ is being looked at with a suspicious eye by quantum physicists engaged in time reversal symmetry – because it would seem time may move forwards AND backwards.

The timeslip is a phenomenon by which a person may find him or herself back in the past or in the future; we are all slipping into the future at the rate of one second per second of course, but in the timeslips I am talking about, people could find themselves hours to centuries in the future – or the past.

In late March 2020, when the country was in lockdown because of the Covid-19 pandemic, a homeless 45-year-old man named Gavin was looking for a place to sleep for the night.

For the past three years he had been sleeping rough, starting with ‘sofa surfing’ at friends’ homes until their patience wore thin because of a drinking problem.

There was talk of schemes to get the homeless off the streets into emergency ‘Covid-safe’ accommodation but no one had reached out to Gavin yet.

He walked along a deserted Oxton Road, Wirral United Kingdom, heading towards Grange Road, where an old school friend named George was possibly living in a flat over a shop.

If George was still there, surely he wouldn’t turn him away? Gavin bowed his head to the icy eye-watering wind with his scarf wrapped around his neck, his old tweed jacket buttoned up, and his cold fist clenched around the strap of a satchel that contained a five-pound note, a little radio with a dying battery, someone’s lost reading spectacles, underwear, socks and a copy of the novella Jonathan Livingston Seagull.

Before Gavin reached Grange Road, something extraordinary happened.

There was an explosion of noise – people’s voices, horses clip-clopping as they pulled trundling carts, and now the sun was blazing down.

Gavin felt he had been transported to Spain, yet the surroundings were vaguely familiar.

McDonalds had gone, and in its place was a huge public house. He was still in the area of Charing Cross but this was obviously the past, and it looked as if it was summer. Gavin thought he should go into the pub where McDonalds had been less than a minute ago, but a policeman stepped into his path and said, ‘Where are you from?’ and he looked Gavin up and down and his steely pale blue eyes, which looked fluorescent under the shade of his peaked helmet, zeroed in on Gavin’s satchel.

‘Look, officer, you’re not going to believe this, but I am from the year two-thousand and twenty,’ said Gavin, and now he went from the optimism of feeling summer heat on his face to the terrible realisation he was back in another age, possibly Victorian.

The policeman thinned those prominent blue eyes and said: ‘That’s a right tall tale you’re spinning. Reckon you better start talkin’, or it’s off to the clink with ya! Name and business, sharpish.’

‘My name’s Gavin [and he gave his surname and his former address when he lived on Claremount Road, Wallasey three years ago]. And I don’t have a business nowadays, I’m homeless. I used to be a computer programmer.’

Gavin said the last sentence meekly because he knew this policeman would not have an idea what that occupation was. He just knew he was going to be arrested now and interrogated.

The copper pushed his helmet back slightly and scratched his forehead. ‘Well, I daresay, I’ve never encountered such a far-fetched load of poppycock in all my years! Are you quite in your right mind, sir, or have you taken leave of your senses?’

‘I know it sounds crazy but I’m telling the truth,’ said Gavin, his mouth drying up. There was a scream behind the policeman and he turned to look at two men fighting outside the pub Gavin had been heading for – the Grange Hotel.

The policeman turned back to Gavin and said, ‘You are to stay here while I go and deal with them! Got that?’ and he pointed to the small traffic island and then he ran to the battling drunks.

Gavin remained rooted to the spot for a moment, and then he took a chance and fled down Grange Road. He almost collided with a cycle and trailer – a bizarre arrangement where a man in a straw boater was pedalling a bicycle that had a two-wheeled rickshaw type of vehicle tethered to it which was occupied by a woman in an enormous hat decorated with artificial flowers.

Gavin kept running, trying to put as much distance between himself and that policemen as possible; the idea of being stranded in this bygone age in a grim cell at a police station frightened him.

Gavin ended up on Conway Street, where a rough-looking young man and an associate named Tommy approached him and the former asked what was in the satchel. ‘Nothing of any value, just clothes,’ said Gavin, knowing what was coming next.

‘Giz it here,’ said Tommy, and he took the satchel from Gavin and said to his friend, ‘Shall we take his coat Johnny?’

A man came out of a nearby pawnbrokers and said to the two ruffians, ‘Return that back to this man or I’ll inform that policeman down there!’

“Johnny” threw the satchel at the feet of Gavin and he and Tommy slinked off down an alleyway.

‘You alright, sir?’ the man asked and explained he was one of the proprietors of the nearby pawnbroker’s shop and he advised Gavin to go and talk to the policeman in the distance. ‘The big fellah who wanted your bag was John Rimmer. He’s well-known to the police.’

‘Thanks very much,’ said a grateful Gavin, having no intention of approaching any policeman because of the outlandish predicament. He posed a query that must have seemed very strange to the pawnbroker: ‘I know this may sound odd, but what year are we in now?’

‘Eh?’ asked the puzzled Good Samaritan.

‘I had a knock on the head and I can’t remember what year it is,’ said a quick-thinking Gavin.

‘It’s 1909,’ the man replied, and advised Gavin to see a physician.

Marriage Saved By a Time Slip Phenomenon

Traveling through time: The story of Irene Corbally Kuhn

The shock of hearing that it was 1909 made Gavin feel dizzy, and in an instant, he found himself back in 2020.

Not long after this he came down with Covid and he had a worrying thought: could he have passed that accursed virus on to that policeman, or those ruffians back in 1909?

Hypotheses

List of versions containing features matching the eyewitness descriptions or material evidence

Deliberate falsification

This version includes any falsifications that imitate unexplained phenomena both from the outside: practical jokes, flash mobs, fake news, witness fraud, staging, etc.

There are many ways to make something similar to a ghost or a flying saucer from improvised materials, without using video and photomontage.

Many homemade things made for the sake of a joke, a practical joke or a direct imitation of a mystical being or event can be taken as unexplained not only in photos and videos, but also in reality.

Investigation

Versions testing, their confirmation or refutation. Additional information, notes during the study of materials
Not enough information

Resume

The most likely explanation. The version, confirmed by the investigation
Not enough information

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